Motion Metrics News

The latest news and technology in mining.


November 16th, 2018

Motion Metrics Earns Repeat Customers in Canada and the United States

It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of chasing new customers and new markets, but often, the most rewarding opportunities lie with existing clients.  One of our key measures of success is a high repeat purchase rate, so this week we turn our attention to three North American clients who saw such value in their first LoaderMetrics™ Missing Tooth Detection solutions that they bought additional systems.

Often what inspires our customers to repeat purchase orders is our willingness to collaborate on product features and development.  This was what drove one of our LoaderMetrics™ clients, a nickel mine in Eastern Canada, to buy additional systems from us after an initial purchase in 2016.

Although ShovelMetrics™ is in use at subarctic mines in Sweden and Canada, this was our first time operating LoaderMetrics™ in extreme winter conditions where temperatures dip as low as -40˚ Celsius. The mine was pleased to find that our team proactively modified the LoaderMetrics™ hardware to ensure peak performance in this challenging environment and undertook rigorous testing to ensure minimal implementation risk.

We modified and rigorously tested LoaderMetrics™ to withstand the harsh subarctic winter at a nickel mine in Eastern Canada.

After installing and commissioning the system, our Support team worked closely with the mine to ensure they reaped the full benefits of our product.  As with all clients who opt into our Remote Support contracts, we monitor the LoaderMetrics™ system regularly and notify mine personnel when any improvements can be made, or attention is needed on-site.  We also solicit regular feedback from the mine and take their interests into consideration when developing new product features.  Ultimately, the mine has seen such value in LoaderMetrics™ and our expert Support team that they purchased another solution this year.

Although our technology is cutting-edge, some of the reasons that our clients choose us are decidedly low-tech.  For one open-pit copper mine in Arizona, our willingness to collaborate set us apart from the competition and gave them confidence in our ability to get the job done.  In this case, the mine was already using LoaderMetrics™ on an older loader and asked us to install a second solution on a new loader model that we hadn’t encountered before.

Customizing LoaderMetrics™ for this novel loader type required significant collaboration between our team and the mine, with us designing new mounting hardware that the mine could then manufacture.  After commissioning the loader, our Support team made regular visits to ensure that LoaderMetrics™ was operating as intended.  The mine greatly appreciated our diligence and recently purchased an additional system.

We custom-designed the camera bucket for a new loader type we encountered at an open-pit copper mine in Arizona.

For some mines, our reputation for exceptional customer service is the deciding factor when choosing a missing tooth detection solution for their loaders.  For others, the value of our product is simply too obvious to do without.  In 2016, we sold LoaderMetrics™ to a second open-pit copper mine in Arizona.  Within a year, they were so impressed by the amount of time and money LoaderMetrics™ had saved them that they purchased an additional system.  Moreover, the mine has mandated that their loaders may not be operated unless our LoaderMetrics™ system is running.

None of the three (3) mines profiled in this article has experienced a crusher obstruction caused by a missing tooth since installing LoaderMetrics™.  With that kind of track record, we think you’d be hard-pressed to find a reason not to try out our missing tooth detection solution.  For more information about LoaderMetrics™, please visit our product page.   Or, read our latest LoaderMetrics™ case study to find out how the Los Pelambres copper mine in Chile used this missing tooth detection solution to mitigate ~144 hours of lost production.